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    Molecular Engineering Thermodynamics (Cambridge Series in Chemical Engineering) review []  2020-2-10 18:40

    I bought this book since it was the reference text to the author's class. It isn't clear on who this book is written for. The text doesn't go in-depth in the thermodynamic zone as other (chemical) engineering thermodynamic books do (or as taught in the course) and has very small statistical mechanics that the author doesn't use that chapter as a reference in that part of the course. The example issues are the only thing that is useful though they're extremely tedious and seem to try more of your ability to remember some 1st and 2nd year math than actually reinforce principles. I hope a second edition goes deeper and expand on core principles.

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    Molecular Engineering Thermodynamics (Cambridge Series in Chemical Engineering) review []  2020-2-10 18:40

    Multicomponent Thermodynamics here I come!

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    Molecular Engineering Thermodynamics (Cambridge Series in Chemical Engineering) review []  2020-2-10 18:40

    Beautiful useful

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Prentice Hall International Series in the Physical and Chemical Engineering Sciences) review []  2020-1-21 21:46

    This book is very concise about the use of thermodynamics in Chemical Engineering, and I think its structure is perfect

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Prentice Hall International Series in the Physical and Chemical Engineering Sciences) review []  2020-1-21 21:46

    The book came as a misprint and was missing a full chapter and a half which is not very convenient if you need to refer to the book.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Prentice Hall International Series in the Physical and Chemical Engineering Sciences) review []  2020-1-21 21:46

    The pages fall out when you turn them even though it was brand new. The binding was beautiful not good quality.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Prentice Hall International Series in the Physical and Chemical Engineering Sciences) review []  2020-1-21 21:46

    This book has MANY MANY errors. I am chemical engineering student who is taking Ch E 220 and I am currently using the book. Even though I bought the International edition, which is twice as cheap and doesn't include as a lot of errors, it still severely lacks proofreading. Some of the mistakes are in grammar and use of words. Take a look at this sentence: "The notion of the cycle requires us to consider the costs of restoring the system to its original state before we can create pronouncements of efficiency" (page 165). What the hell does that mean? Or take Example 4.19. How in the globe can you multiply specific by mass and ln(T2/T1) and obtain troops of kJ/kg. Not only does the book have this appalling mistake, but also Mr. Matsoukas' lectures. The pages fall out too. I am currently reading the book and almost the entire chapter 3 is e writing:In certain parts of the book you obtain the feeling that the author is writing for professors rather than for students. He is making the book sound more like a manual rather than something for first-time learners. Take a look at a sentence from Section 1.2 page 11: "The distinction between classical and statistical thermodynamics is partly artificial, partly pedagogical. Artificial, because thermodynamics makes physical sense when we consider the molecular phenomena that produce the observed behaviors. From a pedagogical perspective, however, a proper statistical treatment requires more time to develop..." What the author meant is that although thermodynamics makes sense only when we actually know what's event on the molecular level, statistical theory requires more time to develop, so at first there should only be a simplified classical theory. The book is teeming with confusing descriptions like these.When I think of Mr. Matsoukas, I imagine a 60 years old professor with leather patches on his arms and huge lens glasses and someone who writes books to earn enough cash to retire in Florida. Stop confusing the youth. Write something that makes sense and that is simple to follow and enjoyable to read.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (Prentice Hall International Series in the Physical and Chemical Engineering Sciences) review []  2020-1-21 21:46

    This book includes too numerous errors to count and appears as though it was not proof read or edited before being published. If you do not already know thermodynamics, it is likely you will be more confused after reading this book than before. Do not buy it.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    This text was difficult to obtain into and not recommended if you are looking to study the topic on your own. I purchased this for a class and the professor had a very amazing understanding of controls and both chemical and electrical systems which created the use of this book easier. If your professor is not providing supplemental information, this book may not aid in your learning of the subject. The use of MATLAB syntax written in the book provided amazing assistance in performing the issues at the end of the chapter.On another note, it seems that compared to the fourth edition, the fifth edition is missing some helpful topics especially the review subjects that were in previous editions.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    Decent book, information is there. Very hard to find through by the inconspicuous format of secion titles. This makes finding info and using the text slow and aggravating. Definitely a subject that benefits by a amazing teacher.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    The book is amazing even if the topic is terrible.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    Provides issues that aid in learning material. Written material sometimes not in depth enough but otherwise adequate. I would suggest using MATLAB examples on your own in order to gain a boost in learning material.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    This is a very simple to read textbook that gives a amazing introduction to classical and modern control theory. The text covers PID and Lead-Lag in both root-locus and bode plot design, nyquist plots, stability, state-space, optimal and LQR control, as well as some robust control. Amazing beginner textbook for controls

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    This was the textbook for my controls class in college. Its a amazing book with a lot of info but I found some explanations complicated. I had to research some things online to obtain better explanations.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    Ogata is, in my opinion the best control system book out there, at this level - from there you can go to Bryson and Ho's book, which includes all there is to know about optimal control. A water down ver of Bryson is Lewis (from G-tech) but it is still good. Ogata will prepare your for both - the only issue I found with Ogata is that the ver I was taught from, did not have physical examples translated to differential equations, then to the frequency domain. That is it did not present you how the "plant" that needs to be controlled was formed - granted it is not a modeling book; if would support if a physical example was translated to the transfer function. The fresh book, hopefully translates physical realization to transfer functions from first principles. I had to take a course in the chemical engineering department who model chemical tanks, as stages of first order systems, and present applications of flow or heat control. It was here that I started to place a physical connection to the control plant. Being a EE all we obtain taught is math in control systems, the ME and ChemE Folks have a much better presentation of the material as it pertains to engineering application. Ogata will teach you the math - which if you have taken undergraduate complex analysis will seem cake to you; but the app s are very cool. Test to hold a physical realization in mind when you begin deriving stability plots in the root locus domain. It will help.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    Strangely, of the numerous textbooks on control systems I own, just one of them sticks out. I've got a lot of of the major ones, in particular Kuo 9e, Ogata 5e, Franklin 5e, Dorf/Bishop, and Nise 5e. Franklin is worst -- rambling, unstructured, Ogata is almost as poor -- not good English, loose, unmotivated tip with a handbook feel to it, and Kuo ranks between so-so and decent -- I suspect it was better organized in the older revisons. Dorf I've not used as much (my feeling is it's partly all right). On the other hand, Nise: Of the 60 or so textbooks on electrical and mechanincal engineering I have, Nise is top three and probably at the very top. Its language and stuctured organization is superb. Ogata as well as the others mentioned have an perfect command of their material, but their presentations are inadequate. I just wanted to allow you know that there is an exception that serves up in both departments.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    Amazing book. However, book cover and page numbers do not exactly match the picture posted in the advertisement. Perfect price.

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    Modern Control Engineering review []  2019-12-24 20:5

    Not good use of color. Not too sure I liked to order of chapters. Waaaaaaaaaaaaay to expensive.

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    I love this textbook. It is one of the best textbooks, if not the best, that I have ever owned, and does an perfect job of covering a very conceptually challenging subject. The writing style is clear and enjoyable to read. The chapters are well organized, so it is simple to search specific points, and there are frequent and helpful examples. This latest point is especially necessary in an engineering textbook. With few exceptions, it covers every subject thoroughly, without skipping logical or mathematical steps. This book definitely contributed to how much I enjoyed my Thermodynamics course.I have no complaints.

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    Amazing service for providing college textbooks for rent. Saves me lots of money.

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    This book was falling apart. Large chunks of pages would completely come out of the book.

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    Nice lease

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    Great!

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    Liked everything about this product, no problems.

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    In amazing condition!

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    Great!

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    Reasonably priced book. Amazing deal!

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    Engineering and Chemical Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:40

    No comment

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    THERMODYNAMICS: AN ENGINEERING APPROACH review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    The book arrived, it is brand fresh and clean. There not much more I can say. It was a amazing deal.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Industry standard, except I hope schools stop using textbooks that use English units. The rest of the globe doesn't use them. Even the ENGLISH don't use them, so why does America still force that nonsense down the throats of its own graduates, engineers and scientists? Let's move on people.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Paid $220 for this book and it came in the worst "box" I've ever seen. Just a folded piece of cardboard taped on some edges. Should have taken a picture of it. You could see the side of the pages of the book without even opening it. No shock dampening material at all. 4/5 because it was surprisingly unharmed.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    The 8th edition has lots of practice issues (with answers to the odd numbered ones), both of which are missing in the newer 9th edition! Go with the 8th - it's cheaper and better.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Liked this book and the class, was very informitive in a method that was applicible to the world

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    The textbook has all of the content (as it should). However, as far as quality goes, it's poor. The pages started to fall out an hour after I opened it, and a lot of the pages are chop off because the printer didn't print the pages right. The binding is horrible at best.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Really amazing book with cool content. Would totally recommend this book to my friends.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    What I expected. thank you

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Every other page in the entire book is printed with the layers slightly offset, making it hard to read half of it.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    Does an decent job at explaining the topics. I mostly use the formulas in the chapter summaries and the tables in the back.

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-22 23:41

    I rent it for class. It's obviously that the book is not fresh on the cover, but it's completed inside and pages are all clean. Quite satisfied.

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    Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2019-12-23 20:22

    This book is terrible. It has an poor habit of leaping from equation to equation randomly with no explanation why. It also brings up a stupid amount of equations, one chapter has about 98 in it when you'll only ever use about 4 or 5 at most. With the Connect software that you will probably have to use, this book also just feels pointless since you could order it with a discounted price after getting Connect access.If you are a professor considering this book, please reconsider. I've never felt more confused about a class that is in my major and it doesn't support that the book produces too a lot of equations that I don't even know when to use.

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    Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2019-12-23 20:22

    It’s a textbook, and I got it in amazing condition. Not the most interesting read but it is exactly what it says it is.

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    Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2019-12-23 20:22

    I want I knew ahead of time that the paperback ver is the international edition. It might be the same as the hard bound US edition, but I don't know. I also don't know why there is no photo available for the paperback edition. Please see the photo I have uploaded. In the yellow badge on the bottom right corner it states "This International Student Edition is for use outside the U.S." I want I had know that before I ordered.

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    Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2019-12-23 20:22

    Amazing condition!!

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    Introduction to Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2019-12-23 20:22

    Amazing price and quick service.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    This book was intended for undergrads. However, I feel this book is more advanced for that unless this is at least your second thermo book. With that said, this is an perfect book on chemical engineering thermodynamics. It has a lot of a lot of perfect sections, and too a lot of too list. But it is not excellent happening though it is more excellent than any other graduate level text books I own. Unlike undergraduate text books, graduate text books are never excellent to me. The topics, the depth are never excellent for self study. I alway use one book as a basic source and use a couple of other ones as reference. But I search this book is exceptional and I did not purchase another book on this e only complain I have about this book is its treatment on entropy. It is too terse and too quick. Entropy is critical for subsequent understanding of Gibbs free energy and so forth. But there is an simple solution. Obtain yourself Moran's book as a companion to bridge the gap and maybe a few other minor gaps you search here and a summary, I would not buy this book if this were my first thermo book. I will highly recommend it, however, to people who already know the basics.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    I like this book. Rationale:1. The mathematical rigor, the absolute only method to communicate anything in the physical sciences, is very much present. If you don't know what total differentials are, as well as simultaneous equations, function notation, differential equations, and the like, don't balk at its presence in this book. It's necessary.2. The examples (called "Illustrations" for some odd reason) are sufficient in number, and, after doing out the examples myself, key concepts I was missing sunk in, to the credit of Dr. Sandler.3. Ample Figures and Diagrams well-described.4. A very amazing system of equation numbering (it seems that equations simultaneous to each other, or algebraically equivalent are assigned alphabetical suffixes).5. Plenty of room in the margins to write comments (Sandler encourages this, and I do too).I could go on. I'll leave you with an algorithm to reading this book that I found helpful:HOW TO READ THIS BOOK: Use a pencil and take notes on each and every word in this book. Then, go back and recopy the Illustrations into a notebook (or into your computer using any word processor, and MathType, a very nice FREE software pack obtainable upon any Google search. I know. A tangent.)...This is working really well, since, as you take notes in the book, you obtain to skip over the Illustrations (and you obtain to feel like you're moving fast!), and when you're doing the Illustrations, you obtain to skip over the text (ditto). It also helps if, when Sandler references an equation in the text (example, "Eq. 6.4-25"), circle this equation reference and write its page number next to it (example, p. 217).Best Wishes!UPDATE: This book is not just a model thermodynamics textbook, it's a model for all textbooks.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    While I thoroughly enjoyed the class, I found this book to be somewhat difficult to read. The worked out example issues were definitely helpful, but I was left to a lot of times having to take a step they did "at face value," due to a lack of for the additional content on the CD, its almost all useless. The MATLAB scripts are outdated, and will not run unless you correct them yourself. This was not a issue for me, but others lacking Matlab experience might struggle. The graphs on the CD are useful supplements to the book, as the reproductions in the book are oftentimes little and hard to read.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    This book is really complex and not helpful to learn from if you've never taken (or briefly taken) thermodynamics before. You definitely need the teacher to explain what is going on in the book (which mine doesn't so relying on the book doesn't help). The issues are mostly various from the examples in the book and definitely not straightforward at all (I would not have been able to solve some of the issues if my teacher didn't present me how to do them because some are tricky and you need to know small tricks here and there). Furthermore, if you are one of those persons that needs to see almost every step to solving problems, this book skips quite a bit of steps and leaves you wondering how they got there. It would be a amazing book if you already know thermodynamics and are a graduate student. For those taking thermo (for some crazy requisite, like I need to despite the fact that I'm in environmental engineering) not a amazing textbook.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    The book level is indeed a small bit high for an undergraduate student, in the other hand, it's very practical in representing how to perform REAL and USEFUL calculations. I have two degrees in chemical and Process Engineer, and if you are a person who must work very often with process programming and simulation, this book is essential. If you're looking for more common information, primary concepts and definitions (enthalpy, cycles, steam tables, etc...), maybe you should test other books first, like Smith and Van Ness', or Van Wylen's book. It's mostly a book for chemical and process engineers, I wouldn't recommend it for mechanical, electric or other engineering fields.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    Alright book. Has some examples that are helpful, but lacks in areas. Taking chem eng thermo that had begin book exams I found it to be a valuable resource at times. If your exams aren't begin book I would avoid as there are better resources available online.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    This book's binding was literally tore from it pages. The outside cover had water hurt and was literally falling apart. I won't do this again, and I should not have to pay this much cash for an upper level college book.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    Un libro bellísimo, toda una joya y en perfecto estado!!!

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    The binding on this book is very loose compared to some of the other chemical engineering books I've ordered. Other than that, the book does a amazing job explaining the thermodynamic concepts I need to know for class.

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    Chemical, Biochemical, and Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-8 19:47

    This book is gold of and chemical engineers in the house

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    This is a amazing ckground: This text was used in Spring 2014 for Donald P. Visco's undergraduate course in Equilibrium Thermodynamics taught within the Chemical Engineering Department at The University of Akron. This course was taken by mostly STEM and Honors students. This was the first semester of the text's publication. The class completed Chapters 1-14Content: This text is thorough. Derivations are simple to follow with steps clearly outlined and assumptions clearly stated. The text pushes the student to question why thermodynamic relationships exist at both micro- and macroscopic levels. Chapter Issues and Concept Questions are challenging but not overwhelming.Positives: The text seems to have been the right level for students. I personally learned more from this text than in any previous class. The text was well-reviewed, and errors were sparse--unlike a lot of other Chemical Engineering texts. I will be keeping this text available for reference, something I cannot say for other gatives: Certain mainstream methods are only briefly examined in this text. A prime example is UNIFAC, which is only given a half page of explanation in the text. There also a powerful reliance on spreadsheet programs in the later portion of the text with relationship modeling. While the latter problem appears to be de facto method of teaching 1-, 2-parameter Margules, Van Laar, etc...the amount of work needed to complete Chapter Issues substantially increases in the later chapters of the portant Negative: The binding was mediocre, and the printing itself was not good quality. The ink appears to be cheap (can wash off really easily) and is extremely faded throughout the book in different places. The publisher really did a subpar job with the printing of the text, and it's poor enough to push away from the craftsmanship of the nclusion: This is a solid alternative to other thermodynamic textbooks on the market. While my class obviously benefited from having the author as the professor for my thermodynamics course, I believe this text is useful in a lot of classrooms. The textbook certainly was not rushed to shop by the professors and editors, but the publishing house really released a subpar product.Overall, a amazing text.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    I'm in Dahm's thermo class and I can say this textbook is the best one I've used in my undergrad thus far. The issues are a amazing representation of what you should be learning, and the examples are very clear. In addition, the book is very amazing at explaining some very abstract concepts, which is probably one of the hardest things about thermodynamics. I recommend the text book and if you go to Rowan, definitely take Dahm.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    As far as thermo books go, this one is actually really good. The examples are unbelievable and it's simple to learn e seller packaged the book appropriately and it arrived in unbelievable condition.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Not good scanning on the e-book makes the diagrams in the appendix unreadable, which are beautiful necessary if you ever wish to obtain your homework done.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Amazing Thank you

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Good

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Still have not received this item! Very disappointed with service and book was required for class a week ago!

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Wonderful

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    Engineering Thermodynamics: by Knowledge flow review []  2020-1-22 21:3

    This book info a bit on the laws of thermo, about work,heat and internal energy. Also mentioned are the various processes by which heat can be moved. Which then ties in to the grand finale true globe ex of a refrigerator, which is an ex of thermo principles in action. Latent heat being absorbed and released through compression and condensing stems and utilizing liquids with amazing properties to let them to move between various states as purposes by the engineer's design.

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    Engineering Thermodynamics: by Knowledge flow review []  2020-1-22 21:3

    It had a lot of facts but it's simple to spot that it was not edited. The sheer amount of easy spelling and grammatical errors is a allow down, but despite it all it provided some primary level of knowledge on the subject. It's not as thorough on the topic and can't be used as a complete tutorial on the subject, or a substitute for a college level text perhaps, but if one is simply looking to gain basic, rudimentary knowledge on the topic it's a amazing introduction.

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    Engineering Thermodynamics: by Knowledge flow review []  2020-1-22 21:3

    Amazing book for engineers. It helps in my carreer . I suggest the book to others for learning thermometer dynamics

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    Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 9th Edition review []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Do NOT obtain EBOOK unless you like failing. Cannot take notes with apple pencil or scroll 's unacceptable that the Kindle is application is still garbage and doesn't let you to write on the ebook or quickly swipe vertically through the pages. In a thermo class these are essential.... For $60 , I would expect to be able to fully engage with the text, but that is impossible with this book as I can't use my apple pencil because Kindle application is incompetent. Amazon needs to hire some of those comp sci interns to modernize this application and create it usable for students who need to write on the book in order to e built in note feature is garbage and a head ache to use, I recommend either buying the text copy or bootlegging a pdf. that actually lets you write on it. I'm versus the bootlegging but the kindle's incompetence really leaves small 's a shame that software exists that I can place dog ears and a nose on my face instantly via a camera for FREE, but I can't write on a pdf. with an electronic pen for $60.00 = 8 hours minimum wage, which is what most buyers of this book are probably t it together Amazon!

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    Covers a amazing deal more than most know about diesel engines. It is a nice book to have as a reference on the shelf as well. Lots of thorough explanation and diagrams for visual learners as well.

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    Perfect classroom book lots of knowledge and amazing theory .Plenty of pics for understanding topic covered.

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    Amazing book for class.

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    Got exactly what I was looking for in this book. The discription given was spot on. It's not a primary intro book. You do need primary 7nder standing of diesel motors. Over all amazing book and amazing delivery time.

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    very well written

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    Amazing for school

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    amazing !

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    This book like all the Sean Bennett books is very poorly written. The book often contradicts itself. Review questions are not also based on material from the current edition as the industry has changed but the the book uses the same questions from previous editions of the book. even when the topic asked is not discussed in most latest edition. there are typos and other problems key terms in the chapters don't have a definition in the glossary the list goes on. Schools should not use Sean Bennett books there are better books out there however we are stuck with this one.

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    Used in my son's diesel program, a keeper for future reference!

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    Modern Diesel Technology: Diesel Engines review []  2020-1-19 19:3

    is what it is

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    This is a amazing book. Simon Winchester has a unbelievable writing style and is a skillful storyteller. His story is an necessary one due to the importance of precision instruments in our society. That said, there are a fair numbers of little errors and one more major one in the book.He states that, “Jefferson, while U.S. minister to France…told his superiors in Washington”. Jefferson was minister in France from 1785 to 1789. The act creating a capital district along the Potomac River was signed in July 1790. There was no Washington, D.C. when Jefferson was minister in ere are lots of little issues in chapter 8 which discusses GPS. I’m the coauthor of "GPS Declassified: From Intelligent Bombs to Smartphones" which is included in his bibliography. states that Roger Easton, my dad, came up with the idea of using clocks in satellites for a passive ranging navigation system in 1973. In reality, the idea came from a conversation with Dr. Arnold Shostak, father of SETI researcher Seth Shostak, in 1964. He states, “Roger Easton, who at the time worked for the U.S. Navy’s then –named Zone Applications Branch in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas.” Dad worked his whole Naval Research Lab career at its main office in Washington, D.C. The South Texas fence was a separate radar fence that was intended to be an adjunct to the basic Zone fence so that an object’s orbit could be calculated on a single penetration of the two fences. Dad was there in September 1964 trying to synchronize the clocks in the two stations in this fence. He realized that a clock in a satellite could do this and later saw that it could also be used for navigation (following up on his April 1964 conversation with Dr. Shostak referenced above).Winchester then describes the vehicle experiment which showed that passive ranging with clocks would work except he locations it in Texas whereas it was in D.C. “The other he kept at the naval station in which he was working in South Texas. While the observers were watching the oscilloscope screens he had hooked up in the lab, he ordered Maloof to drive the vehicle as far and quick as possible down a road, Texas Route 295, which was unfinished at the time and thus empty.”He’s describing the experiment which occurred on October 16, 1964. See page 9 from the “NRL GPS Bibliography - An Annotated Bibliography of the Origin and Development of the Global Position System at the Naval Research Laboratory” which states, “Easton’s passive ranging concept is demonstrated using a side-tone ranging receiver, modified from the South Texas experiment and placed at NRL, and a transmitter in Matt Maloof’s convertible as he drives it down the I-295 interstate. The street is finished but not yet opened to the public. Two Bureau of Naval Weapons representatives, John Yob and Chester Kleczek, observe the experiment."I-295 is the highway next to NRL’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. It’s not a state street in Texas. There is a reference to a South Texas experiment in the above account, but the try with Maloof’s convertible was in the D.C. area. In a 1996 interview with my Dad, they refer to the Wilson bridge across the Potomac in relation to the experiment. Wikipedia states that, “The first 7.8 miles (12.6 km) of the route opened on August 7, 1964 when the connecting segment of the Capital Beltway opened.” This fits in with an October 16th e most significant error is his assertion that Reagan opened GPS to civilian uses after the shooting down of KAL 007 in 1983. This mistake is common in the literature. However, GPS was a dual use military-civilian system from day 1. The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System Program Management Plan 15 July 1974 can be found under resources on my www service (gpsdeclassified). On page 2-9, it states that, “The C/A Signal will serve as an aid to the acquisition of the P Signal, and will also provide a navigation signal in the clear to both the military and civil user.” Texas Instruments was making in 1981 the TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator GPS Receiver for commercial users. Thus, civilian use was built into GPS in 1974 and a civilian receiver was being sold in 1981. I highly recommend this book in spite of these minor errors.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    This is going to be the strangest review I will probably ever write. You see, I am the reason this book name is Colin Povey, and as the book explains (see page 7) I suggested to the author 7 years ago that the globe required a book on the story of precision.And before I obtain any further, I must tell you that I obtain NO cash nor any other remuneration from the sales of the book. Zip, zero, , why does the globe need a book on the history of, the story of precision? Read college, I was privileged to take a pair of courses, one on the History of Technology, and one on the History of Science, and both taught by the brilliant professor Richard Shallenberg.I loved those courses so much, I have continued to read, study, and even research the subject for the past 40 thing came to me as I studied this history, and that was how much precision has improved over time. The first Newcomen steam engines had a not good fit of the piston to the walls of the cylinder, with some gaps as huge as an inch, if not a small larger. Today, in computer chips, transistors are only 10 nm, or 10 billionths of a meter, , I thought, I'll search a book on the history of azon had nothing like ither did any other on-line or physical book stores.I went to my rather huge county library, and again, I struck out.I went to a huge University library, and found nothing locally, though one previous book had been written on the subject, but it was more than 80 years , I though, the globe needs a book on the history of precision. But I am not a writer (as you can tell if you have gotten this far), I'm a tech geek, a nerd. So I sent a note to a favorite author who wrote books on related subjects. He was nice enough to send a note back saying he didn't think it was a amazing , then I remembered Simon Winchester, author of several books I , I dropped Simon an e-mail with this suggestion. I mean, his www service asks for suggestions!Nothing happened for about 3 months, but then I got a reply, saying he thought it was a amazing idea, but he had to convince his agent. More months passed, and another note arrived in my in-box from Simon, saying the agent though it was a amazing idea. But now came the tough part, convincing at his nths later, a third e-mail from Simon. The editor said yes!Simon was already working on some other books he had already contracted for. So while Simon was finishing them, I started to do research. I knew bits and pieces of stories, and I found others. So, when I had collected a bunch of these together, I sent Simon another e-mail. In total, I sent him six e-mails with precision stories, notes, ideas on people to discuss, and assorted information, some as long as 30 pages. I also included my thoughts on how it was necessary to present how precision had changed over time, and how precision changed the world. For, literally without precision, the globe as we know it today would not exist. Don't believe me, read the book.And then I waited and waited. I got occasional e-mails from Simon, and even a couple of phone calls, but it was taking method longer than I thought it tice that at this point, I have not met Simon. Just e-mails and an occasional phone ly, one day in February 2018, a pack arrives in the mail from Simon, and it's preliminary copy , what he called an advanced reader copy, of the book! And it's entitled The Perfectionists.I was amazed, especially for the story he included about my father, that deals with precision, which Simon included on pages 7-10 of the book.I saw that Simon had taken some of my small suggestions to heart, especially the need to define precision and accuracy, and how, while they are related, they are not the same mon had asked that I read the book, and send in comments and corrections. I blasted through it in just 3 days, I was so amazed at the book, how he had taken it so much further than I ever could en, the book gets published in early May, this point, I am bound and determined to meet Simon. And he is going on a book tour, but sadly, my state of Florida is not on the list. But I see that it starts in DC, my old home town, so I create plans and fly to DC, and spend a long weekend catching up with mates I have known, some of them over 50 years!And then it happens. At a little bookstore in DC, down near the Potomac River, Simon shows up to give his presentation and respond questions on precision. And we finally obtain a possibility to meet.But sadly, it is for only an hour, as he is moving on to Philadelphia to do it all over again the next day, and on and on for about 3 long weeks. Talking to radio shows in the mornings, visiting bookstores in the afternoon and evening, then moving on and doing it all over again. PS Most Authors hate book , enough already, what about the book?It's marvelous. It traces precision, from it's rocky beginnings in England with steam engines, in France, with gun makers, and then back to England, to Portsmouth, where the Royal Navy, had a true issues with acquiring enough blocks, rope blocks, used in hauling goods, and sails, and other essentials around on shore and at sea, and to solve that problem, the respond that one man, Henry Maudslay came up around 1800, did the trick. And the respond Maudslay came up with was so good, the machines were in use for 160 years, finally making their latest blocks in e tale then travels to the US, where …... I can't go on, Simon would probably shoot me if I told you more, as it would spoil the , buy the book, it's marvelous. If you like technical machines of any kind, buy. If you use precision machines, of any kind, buy it. If you just like amazing story telling, buy this book. You will love it.But one more thing. I claim that precision is all around us, everyday, but we just don't see it.A amazing example is probably within 5 feet of you right now. A ballpoint pen.What is precise about them, you ask? I mean, perfectly amazing ballpoint pens can be had for a quarter. What can be precise about them?Well, the fit of the ball to the case or cone has to be very precise, more so than you would think. If the fit is too tight, the ball will jam, and no ink will flow. And if too loose, the ink comes out in blobs, also not acceptable.But what is truly awesome about ball point pens is that the ball cannot be smooth. It has to be precisely made, to roll smoothly, but if is is too smooth, it will not carry ink onto the ball, so it has to be not too small, nor to large, and the surface has to be rough-ish, to carry c, hte biggest maker of ballpoint pens in the world, with their Crystal pen (we've all used one, their clear pen), spends 60-70 HOURS grinding each ball. Obviously, they do it in batches, not individually, but as we have seen. the fit must be very, very precise to work properly.And when I mean all around us, Bic, in 7 factories around the world, makes 1 MILLION Crystal pens a at, my friends, is real precision. And it is all around us, and we take it for mon ends the main part of the book talking about the most precise machines ever made, the LIGO machines, designed to try Einstein's theory of General Relativity. There are two of these machines in the USA, with a third to be built and operated in India. How precise are they? Well, let's just say that they need to do math that involves more than 30 decimal places. Precise enough for you?Buy the book, you will love Outside North America, the book is entitled: Exactly.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    A well-written and thoroughly engaging read, not that this should come as any surprise from this author. Hopefully the few little errors will be corrected in upcoming reprints. (Wonderful to have the input on some of these by Roger Easton's son, too!)I only have one caveat, which I message has not been mentioned in these reviews- and it only pertains to the hardcover edition, which is the one I bought. The quality of the illustrations is simply unacceptable, especially for a full-price hardcover edition. This is partly the effect of using poor-quality matte paper and partly because some of the illustrations are simply too ere are numerous examples- nearly every picture, in fact - but here are a few from the latest part of the book (where I am at present, having nearly finished devouring it.)- On page 316 there is a picture of the internals of a Seiko quartz watch. It is about 1 3/8" in diameter. Were it not for the accompanying text, it would be all but incomprehensible. On high-quaity gloss paper it would fare better, but not here.- Page 283, a picture of the first transistor, invented by Bell Labs. Not good contrast and detail, a fairly consistent issue with most of the pictures. On high-quality paper it would be OK.And the worst of all, on page 292 is a graph, with included text, of the popular Moore's Law which is, with the exception of the top line header, unreadable. The illustration is full-width (about 4.2") but even on the finest-quality paper it would be largely unintelligible. I measured the type under the headline, under amazing light, with an eye loupe, with a micrometer (well, this IS a book about precision!) It measured about .016", which is around 1.5pt. Under the loupe, it is clearly spotty, due to the rough surface of the paper, which would not be the case on good, gloss paper, assuming that the industry printing standard is still 2450 dpi. This makes the print on the bottles of Dr. Bronner's soap products look large in comparison. The type along the diagonal line of the graph is even smaller, probably close to 1pt. This illustration ought to have been on its own page, in landscape mode (and, again, on better paper)I have a mate with the Kindle edition, and the illustrations are fine there. And in the case of the Moore's Law illustration, one can at least zoom is is a superb book, but which in its print edition doesn't really do justice to the material or the author, and reflects badly on the publisher. It could be argued that print editions are less famous now than electronic, but if you (in this case, Harper Collins) are going to do a print edition, especially a hard-cover full-price one by a well-known author, it should meet certain print quality criteria, and it seems to me that the publisher has really allow us down in that respect.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    If I had noticed that this is the #1 best selling book in the science measurement category I might not have bought it. That is one oversight I am extremely grateful for, however. This is a very amazing book that is sure to surprise you and you do not have to be an engineer or a scientist to appreciate chester is a modern polymath with a high level of curiosity, both scientific and philosophical. And that’s why he may be the only person with the expertise to have written this e author catalogues the advancement of technology from the Industrial Revolution to the Digital Revolution. (This is definitely NOT another book about the disruptors of Silicon Valley.) His examples are simple to follow and very informative. Except for the founders of Intel, he spends most of his time on inventers and engineers you probably haven’t heard of.And it works because in the end this is not so much a book about technology as it is a book about precision. Accuracy allows us to create nice things that last, but technological and scientific advancement require precision in both dimension and location. Engineering, in fact, outstripped precision quite early in the Industrial Age until people like John Wilkinson, Joseph Bramah, and Henry Maudslay came along and saw the ilosophy enters the picture when Winchester notes the obvious duality between science and nature. Science requires precision. Nature abhors it. “For might there be in the wider world, in truth, simply too much precision? Might today’s singular devotion to mechanical exactitude be clouding a valued but very various component of the human condition, one that, as a result, is being allowed to vanish?”Precision allows computation. Imprecision, however, requires thought. Binary processors are very precise. Books, written in the human construct of language, are not. And that’s why I think it’s a shame that a lot of people today are reading less. Computation without thought is not n we not also assume that precision takes money? The amazing scientific computers of today require the accuracy of atomic clocks rather than the easy quartz watch that most of us obtain by with. The meter wasn’t precise enough for the International Astronomical Union so they developed the Angstrom, a length equal to one ten-billionth of a meter, defined by the spectral wavelength emitted by heated cadmium.And who is going to pay for all of that precision? And what do we do with the people who don’t have access to it? Everything, including precision and technology, exists in context. We cannot blindly pursue the latter without understanding the implications for our social, educational, and economic institutions and systems.If we ignore it, nature will win. “Before the imprecision of the natural world, all will falter, none shall survive—no matter how precise.”

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    This book has been nominated for the UK's famous science book prize. It may even have won by now. Hopefully not as it has a number of e concept of the book is very intriguing. How has increasing precision (engineering precision) developed over time and affected the products that we buy or how has precision affected our lives. For the first six chapters Winchester sticks to this brief and describes the development of precision from 1774 to the 20th century very well. If the book had stopped at chapter six it would have been worthy of five stars and a science book prize. Unfortunately it goes on for another four chapters plus an afterword which should really been an 11th chapter. The true issue with the latter half of the book is the editing. Well the lack of editing. In the first six chapters the language is evocative and in the style of an eccentric school teacher. In the second half Winchester gets his thesaurus out and substitutes twenty words where one or two would have been much more effective. This becomes tiresome very quickly as well as allowing some errors to creep is lack of editing ruins the book, losing the importance of the innovations in a forest of unnecessary words and allowing some errors to creep in too. Buuy it for the first six chapters and tolerate the rest of it. It is an interesting read but the author should have been reigned in which would have created this a amazing book.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    I found this book so absorbing and well-written that before I had finished the second chapter, I ordered another copy for a retired engineer mate as a gift. And on balance, it continued to impress me until . . . the latest chapter. There, Winchester pivots suddenly to Japan, where he pretends to search some special and profound appreciation for both precision and craftsmanship -- as if they are somehow inconsistent, or not fully appreciated elsewhere. It was puzzling and unconvincing -- another example of an author just trying to finish the damned book (or so it seemed to me). And then . . . a long afterword on metrology that really should have been part of the main text, which only confirmed my feeling that the author had just run out of steam -- or perhaps needs a fresh editor.But as I say, on balance, a really impressive and interesting book.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    It's a nice acc of how precision measurement and fabrication advanced over the latest 2 1/2 centuries. I've always been fascinated by that so I had actually hoped for a lot more detail on just HOW they accomplished it rather than just WHAT was accomplished. For example, we learn about the wonderful surface flatness of gage blocks but not how someone actually makes them that way. If you're enough of a techie or gearhead to read a book about precision, but aren't a machinist who actually knows, you're just dying to learn the info of how people fabricate something to wonderful tolerances. That's why I give it only 3 stars

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    The focus is almost entirely upon the lives of the 'engineers' rather than the 'precision', they achieved. Small description of how the engineers actually achieved their focus on accuracy and why. A non-technical work, just a historical acc than a explanation of how and why but interesting as far as it goes.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    Simon Winchester writes an unusual kind of intellectual page-turner. "The Professor and the Madman" tells the story of the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary. "Krakatoa" explains what happened when that island exploded in 1883."The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Made the Modern World" is an outstanding exploration of how increasing precision created steam power, firearms, GPS, jet turbines and much more possible. In each of those domains, Winchester makes the subject of precision, and its tooling, e final chapter, "On the Necessity for Equipoise," explores the attraction of craft and imprecision in a globe rushing headlong to ever-more-precise measure. It's near poetry in concept and in composition.And the afterword, on the history of metrology, is fascinating. Just lately we heard of the demise of Le Grand K, and the change to measuring mass in terms of the Planck constant. Winchester unwinds that long story, and points out that every single fundamental measure we create now is based on time. I had not realized it.If 355 pages in hardback (plus end matter), all on the concept of "precision," sounds interesting to you, you'd love this book.

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    The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-19 18:53

    A book about engineers. About precision instruments. About precision itself. How boring! But not in the hands of the brilliant Simon Winchester who knows how to tell a story so well that he has made another page turner. About how the British navy drove the early precise engineering because they required 1400 pulleys for their warships. About Eli Whitney, whom we know as the cotton gin’s inventor, who was also a top flight con artist. Read this book—as well as some of Winchester’s other books such as Krakatoa.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    This is a amazing book. Simon Winchester has a unbelievable writing style and is a skillful storyteller. His story is an necessary one due to the importance of precision instruments in our society. That said, there are a fair numbers of little errors and one more major one in the book.He states that, “Jefferson, while U.S. minister to France…told his superiors in Washington”. Jefferson was minister in France from 1785 to 1789. The act creating a capital district along the Potomac River was signed in July 1790. There was no Washington, D.C. when Jefferson was minister in ere are lots of little issues in chapter 8 which discusses GPS. I’m the coauthor of "GPS Declassified: From Intelligent Bombs to Smartphones" which is included in his bibliography. states that Roger Easton, my dad, came up with the idea of using clocks in satellites for a passive ranging navigation system in 1973. In reality, the idea came from a conversation with Dr. Arnold Shostak, father of SETI researcher Seth Shostak, in 1964. He states, “Roger Easton, who at the time worked for the U.S. Navy’s then –named Zone Applications Branch in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas.” Dad worked his whole Naval Research Lab career at its main office in Washington, D.C. The South Texas fence was a separate radar fence that was intended to be an adjunct to the basic Zone fence so that an object’s orbit could be calculated on a single penetration of the two fences. Dad was there in September 1964 trying to synchronize the clocks in the two stations in this fence. He realized that a clock in a satellite could do this and later saw that it could also be used for navigation (following up on his April 1964 conversation with Dr. Shostak referenced above).Winchester then describes the vehicle experiment which showed that passive ranging with clocks would work except he locations it in Texas whereas it was in D.C. “The other he kept at the naval station in which he was working in South Texas. While the observers were watching the oscilloscope screens he had hooked up in the lab, he ordered Maloof to drive the vehicle as far and quick as possible down a road, Texas Route 295, which was unfinished at the time and thus empty.”He’s describing the experiment which occurred on October 16, 1964. See page 9 from the “NRL GPS Bibliography - An Annotated Bibliography of the Origin and Development of the Global Position System at the Naval Research Laboratory” which states, “Easton’s passive ranging concept is demonstrated using a side-tone ranging receiver, modified from the South Texas experiment and placed at NRL, and a transmitter in Matt Maloof’s convertible as he drives it down the I-295 interstate. The street is finished but not yet opened to the public. Two Bureau of Naval Weapons representatives, John Yob and Chester Kleczek, observe the experiment."I-295 is the highway next to NRL’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. It’s not a state street in Texas. There is a reference to a South Texas experiment in the above account, but the try with Maloof’s convertible was in the D.C. area. In a 1996 interview with my Dad, they refer to the Wilson bridge across the Potomac in relation to the experiment. Wikipedia states that, “The first 7.8 miles (12.6 km) of the route opened on August 7, 1964 when the connecting segment of the Capital Beltway opened.” This fits in with an October 16th e most significant error is his assertion that Reagan opened GPS to civilian uses after the shooting down of KAL 007 in 1983. This mistake is common in the literature. However, GPS was a dual use military-civilian system from day 1. The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System Program Management Plan 15 July 1974 can be found under resources on my www service (gpsdeclassified). On page 2-9, it states that, “The C/A Signal will serve as an aid to the acquisition of the P Signal, and will also provide a navigation signal in the clear to both the military and civil user.” Texas Instruments was making in 1981 the TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator GPS Receiver for commercial users. Thus, civilian use was built into GPS in 1974 and a civilian receiver was being sold in 1981. I highly recommend this book in spite of these minor errors.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    This is going to be the strangest review I will probably ever write. You see, I am the reason this book name is Colin Povey, and as the book explains (see page 7) I suggested to the author 7 years ago that the globe required a book on the story of precision.And before I obtain any further, I must tell you that I obtain NO cash nor any other remuneration from the sales of the book. Zip, zero, , why does the globe need a book on the history of, the story of precision? Read college, I was privileged to take a pair of courses, one on the History of Technology, and one on the History of Science, and both taught by the brilliant professor Richard Shallenberg.I loved those courses so much, I have continued to read, study, and even research the subject for the past 40 thing came to me as I studied this history, and that was how much precision has improved over time. The first Newcomen steam engines had a not good fit of the piston to the walls of the cylinder, with some gaps as huge as an inch, if not a small larger. Today, in computer chips, transistors are only 10 nm, or 10 billionths of a meter, , I thought, I'll search a book on the history of azon had nothing like ither did any other on-line or physical book stores.I went to my rather huge county library, and again, I struck out.I went to a huge University library, and found nothing locally, though one previous book had been written on the subject, but it was more than 80 years , I though, the globe needs a book on the history of precision. But I am not a writer (as you can tell if you have gotten this far), I'm a tech geek, a nerd. So I sent a note to a favorite author who wrote books on related subjects. He was nice enough to send a note back saying he didn't think it was a amazing , then I remembered Simon Winchester, author of several books I , I dropped Simon an e-mail with this suggestion. I mean, his www service asks for suggestions!Nothing happened for about 3 months, but then I got a reply, saying he thought it was a amazing idea, but he had to convince his agent. More months passed, and another note arrived in my in-box from Simon, saying the agent though it was a amazing idea. But now came the tough part, convincing at his nths later, a third e-mail from Simon. The editor said yes!Simon was already working on some other books he had already contracted for. So while Simon was finishing them, I started to do research. I knew bits and pieces of stories, and I found others. So, when I had collected a bunch of these together, I sent Simon another e-mail. In total, I sent him six e-mails with precision stories, notes, ideas on people to discuss, and assorted information, some as long as 30 pages. I also included my thoughts on how it was necessary to present how precision had changed over time, and how precision changed the world. For, literally without precision, the globe as we know it today would not exist. Don't believe me, read the book.And then I waited and waited. I got occasional e-mails from Simon, and even a couple of phone calls, but it was taking method longer than I thought it tice that at this point, I have not met Simon. Just e-mails and an occasional phone ly, one day in February 2018, a pack arrives in the mail from Simon, and it's preliminary copy , what he called an advanced reader copy, of the book! And it's entitled The Perfectionists.I was amazed, especially for the story he included about my father, that deals with precision, which Simon included on pages 7-10 of the book.I saw that Simon had taken some of my small suggestions to heart, especially the need to define precision and accuracy, and how, while they are related, they are not the same mon had asked that I read the book, and send in comments and corrections. I blasted through it in just 3 days, I was so amazed at the book, how he had taken it so much further than I ever could en, the book gets published in early May, this point, I am bound and determined to meet Simon. And he is going on a book tour, but sadly, my state of Florida is not on the list. But I see that it starts in DC, my old home town, so I create plans and fly to DC, and spend a long weekend catching up with mates I have known, some of them over 50 years!And then it happens. At a little bookstore in DC, down near the Potomac River, Simon shows up to give his presentation and respond questions on precision. And we finally obtain a possibility to meet.But sadly, it is for only an hour, as he is moving on to Philadelphia to do it all over again the next day, and on and on for about 3 long weeks. Talking to radio shows in the mornings, visiting bookstores in the afternoon and evening, then moving on and doing it all over again. PS Most Authors hate book , enough already, what about the book?It's marvelous. It traces precision, from it's rocky beginnings in England with steam engines, in France, with gun makers, and then back to England, to Portsmouth, where the Royal Navy, had a true issues with acquiring enough blocks, rope blocks, used in hauling goods, and sails, and other essentials around on shore and at sea, and to solve that problem, the respond that one man, Henry Maudslay came up around 1800, did the trick. And the respond Maudslay came up with was so good, the machines were in use for 160 years, finally making their latest blocks in e tale then travels to the US, where …... I can't go on, Simon would probably shoot me if I told you more, as it would spoil the , buy the book, it's marvelous. If you like technical machines of any kind, buy. If you use precision machines, of any kind, buy it. If you just like amazing story telling, buy this book. You will love it.But one more thing. I claim that precision is all around us, everyday, but we just don't see it.A amazing example is probably within 5 feet of you right now. A ballpoint pen.What is precise about them, you ask? I mean, perfectly amazing ballpoint pens can be had for a quarter. What can be precise about them?Well, the fit of the ball to the case or cone has to be very precise, more so than you would think. If the fit is too tight, the ball will jam, and no ink will flow. And if too loose, the ink comes out in blobs, also not acceptable.But what is truly awesome about ball point pens is that the ball cannot be smooth. It has to be precisely made, to roll smoothly, but if is is too smooth, it will not carry ink onto the ball, so it has to be not too small, nor to large, and the surface has to be rough-ish, to carry c, hte biggest maker of ballpoint pens in the world, with their Crystal pen (we've all used one, their clear pen), spends 60-70 HOURS grinding each ball. Obviously, they do it in batches, not individually, but as we have seen. the fit must be very, very precise to work properly.And when I mean all around us, Bic, in 7 factories around the world, makes 1 MILLION Crystal pens a at, my friends, is real precision. And it is all around us, and we take it for mon ends the main part of the book talking about the most precise machines ever made, the LIGO machines, designed to try Einstein's theory of General Relativity. There are two of these machines in the USA, with a third to be built and operated in India. How precise are they? Well, let's just say that they need to do math that involves more than 30 decimal places. Precise enough for you?Buy the book, you will love Outside North America, the book is entitled: Exactly.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    A well-written and thoroughly engaging read, not that this should come as any surprise from this author. Hopefully the few little errors will be corrected in upcoming reprints. (Wonderful to have the input on some of these by Roger Easton's son, too!)I only have one caveat, which I message has not been mentioned in these reviews- and it only pertains to the hardcover edition, which is the one I bought. The quality of the illustrations is simply unacceptable, especially for a full-price hardcover edition. This is partly the effect of using poor-quality matte paper and partly because some of the illustrations are simply too ere are numerous examples- nearly every picture, in fact - but here are a few from the latest part of the book (where I am at present, having nearly finished devouring it.)- On page 316 there is a picture of the internals of a Seiko quartz watch. It is about 1 3/8" in diameter. Were it not for the accompanying text, it would be all but incomprehensible. On high-quaity gloss paper it would fare better, but not here.- Page 283, a picture of the first transistor, invented by Bell Labs. Not good contrast and detail, a fairly consistent issue with most of the pictures. On high-quality paper it would be OK.And the worst of all, on page 292 is a graph, with included text, of the popular Moore's Law which is, with the exception of the top line header, unreadable. The illustration is full-width (about 4.2") but even on the finest-quality paper it would be largely unintelligible. I measured the type under the headline, under amazing light, with an eye loupe, with a micrometer (well, this IS a book about precision!) It measured about .016", which is around 1.5pt. Under the loupe, it is clearly spotty, due to the rough surface of the paper, which would not be the case on good, gloss paper, assuming that the industry printing standard is still 2450 dpi. This makes the print on the bottles of Dr. Bronner's soap products look large in comparison. The type along the diagonal line of the graph is even smaller, probably close to 1pt. This illustration ought to have been on its own page, in landscape mode (and, again, on better paper)I have a mate with the Kindle edition, and the illustrations are fine there. And in the case of the Moore's Law illustration, one can at least zoom is is a superb book, but which in its print edition doesn't really do justice to the material or the author, and reflects badly on the publisher. It could be argued that print editions are less famous now than electronic, but if you (in this case, Harper Collins) are going to do a print edition, especially a hard-cover full-price one by a well-known author, it should meet certain print quality criteria, and it seems to me that the publisher has really allow us down in that respect.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    If I had noticed that this is the #1 best selling book in the science measurement category I might not have bought it. That is one oversight I am extremely grateful for, however. This is a very amazing book that is sure to surprise you and you do not have to be an engineer or a scientist to appreciate chester is a modern polymath with a high level of curiosity, both scientific and philosophical. And that’s why he may be the only person with the expertise to have written this e author catalogues the advancement of technology from the Industrial Revolution to the Digital Revolution. (This is definitely NOT another book about the disruptors of Silicon Valley.) His examples are simple to follow and very informative. Except for the founders of Intel, he spends most of his time on inventers and engineers you probably haven’t heard of.And it works because in the end this is not so much a book about technology as it is a book about precision. Accuracy allows us to create nice things that last, but technological and scientific advancement require precision in both dimension and location. Engineering, in fact, outstripped precision quite early in the Industrial Age until people like John Wilkinson, Joseph Bramah, and Henry Maudslay came along and saw the ilosophy enters the picture when Winchester notes the obvious duality between science and nature. Science requires precision. Nature abhors it. “For might there be in the wider world, in truth, simply too much precision? Might today’s singular devotion to mechanical exactitude be clouding a valued but very various component of the human condition, one that, as a result, is being allowed to vanish?”Precision allows computation. Imprecision, however, requires thought. Binary processors are very precise. Books, written in the human construct of language, are not. And that’s why I think it’s a shame that a lot of people today are reading less. Computation without thought is not n we not also assume that precision takes money? The amazing scientific computers of today require the accuracy of atomic clocks rather than the easy quartz watch that most of us obtain by with. The meter wasn’t precise enough for the International Astronomical Union so they developed the Angstrom, a length equal to one ten-billionth of a meter, defined by the spectral wavelength emitted by heated cadmium.And who is going to pay for all of that precision? And what do we do with the people who don’t have access to it? Everything, including precision and technology, exists in context. We cannot blindly pursue the latter without understanding the implications for our social, educational, and economic institutions and systems.If we ignore it, nature will win. “Before the imprecision of the natural world, all will falter, none shall survive—no matter how precise.”

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    This book has been nominated for the UK's famous science book prize. It may even have won by now. Hopefully not as it has a number of e concept of the book is very intriguing. How has increasing precision (engineering precision) developed over time and affected the products that we buy or how has precision affected our lives. For the first six chapters Winchester sticks to this brief and describes the development of precision from 1774 to the 20th century very well. If the book had stopped at chapter six it would have been worthy of five stars and a science book prize. Unfortunately it goes on for another four chapters plus an afterword which should really been an 11th chapter. The true issue with the latter half of the book is the editing. Well the lack of editing. In the first six chapters the language is evocative and in the style of an eccentric school teacher. In the second half Winchester gets his thesaurus out and substitutes twenty words where one or two would have been much more effective. This becomes tiresome very quickly as well as allowing some errors to creep is lack of editing ruins the book, losing the importance of the innovations in a forest of unnecessary words and allowing some errors to creep in too. Buuy it for the first six chapters and tolerate the rest of it. It is an interesting read but the author should have been reigned in which would have created this a amazing book.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    I found this book so absorbing and well-written that before I had finished the second chapter, I ordered another copy for a retired engineer mate as a gift. And on balance, it continued to impress me until . . . the latest chapter. There, Winchester pivots suddenly to Japan, where he pretends to search some special and profound appreciation for both precision and craftsmanship -- as if they are somehow inconsistent, or not fully appreciated elsewhere. It was puzzling and unconvincing -- another example of an author just trying to finish the damned book (or so it seemed to me). And then . . . a long afterword on metrology that really should have been part of the main text, which only confirmed my feeling that the author had just run out of steam -- or perhaps needs a fresh editor.But as I say, on balance, a really impressive and interesting book.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    It's a nice acc of how precision measurement and fabrication advanced over the latest 2 1/2 centuries. I've always been fascinated by that so I had actually hoped for a lot more detail on just HOW they accomplished it rather than just WHAT was accomplished. For example, we learn about the wonderful surface flatness of gage blocks but not how someone actually makes them that way. If you're enough of a techie or gearhead to read a book about precision, but aren't a machinist who actually knows, you're just dying to learn the info of how people fabricate something to wonderful tolerances. That's why I give it only 3 stars

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    The focus is almost entirely upon the lives of the 'engineers' rather than the 'precision', they achieved. Small description of how the engineers actually achieved their focus on accuracy and why. A non-technical work, just a historical acc than a explanation of how and why but interesting as far as it goes.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    Simon Winchester writes an unusual kind of intellectual page-turner. "The Professor and the Madman" tells the story of the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary. "Krakatoa" explains what happened when that island exploded in 1883."The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Made the Modern World" is an outstanding exploration of how increasing precision created steam power, firearms, GPS, jet turbines and much more possible. In each of those domains, Winchester makes the subject of precision, and its tooling, e final chapter, "On the Necessity for Equipoise," explores the attraction of craft and imprecision in a globe rushing headlong to ever-more-precise measure. It's near poetry in concept and in composition.And the afterword, on the history of metrology, is fascinating. Just lately we heard of the demise of Le Grand K, and the change to measuring mass in terms of the Planck constant. Winchester unwinds that long story, and points out that every single fundamental measure we create now is based on time. I had not realized it.If 355 pages in hardback (plus end matter), all on the concept of "precision," sounds interesting to you, you'd love this book.

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    Exactly: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World review []  2019-12-27 18:43

    A book about engineers. About precision instruments. About precision itself. How boring! But not in the hands of the brilliant Simon Winchester who knows how to tell a story so well that he has made another page turner. About how the British navy drove the early precise engineering because they required 1400 pulleys for their warships. About Eli Whitney, whom we know as the cotton gin’s inventor, who was also a top flight con artist. Read this book—as well as some of Winchester’s other books such as Krakatoa.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, SI Edition review []  2019-12-27 19:5

    This is a amazing ckground: This text was used in Spring 2014 for Donald P. Visco's undergraduate course in Equilibrium Thermodynamics taught within the Chemical Engineering Department at The University of Akron. This course was taken by mostly STEM and Honors students. This was the first semester of the text's publication. The class completed Chapters 1-14Content: This text is thorough. Derivations are simple to follow with steps clearly outlined and assumptions clearly stated. The text pushes the student to question why thermodynamic relationships exist at both micro- and macroscopic levels. Chapter Issues and Concept Questions are challenging but not overwhelming.Positives: The text seems to have been the right level for students. I personally learned more from this text than in any previous class. The text was well-reviewed, and errors were sparse--unlike a lot of other Chemical Engineering texts. I will be keeping this text available for reference, something I cannot say for other gatives: Certain mainstream methods are only briefly examined in this text. A prime example is UNIFAC, which is only given a half page of explanation in the text. There also a powerful reliance on spreadsheet programs in the later portion of the text with relationship modeling. While the latter problem appears to be de facto method of teaching 1-, 2-parameter Margules, Van Laar, etc...the amount of work needed to complete Chapter Issues substantially increases in the later chapters of the portant Negative: The binding was mediocre, and the printing itself was not good quality. The ink appears to be cheap (can wash off really easily) and is extremely faded throughout the book in different places. The publisher really did a subpar job with the printing of the text, and it's poor enough to push away from the craftsmanship of the nclusion: This is a solid alternative to other thermodynamic textbooks on the market. While my class obviously benefited from having the author as the professor for my thermodynamics course, I believe this text is useful in a lot of classrooms. The textbook certainly was not rushed to shop by the professors and editors, but the publishing house really released a subpar product.Overall, a amazing text.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, SI Edition review []  2019-12-27 19:5

    I'm in Dahm's thermo class and I can say this textbook is the best one I've used in my undergrad thus far. The issues are a amazing representation of what you should be learning, and the examples are very clear. In addition, the book is very amazing at explaining some very abstract concepts, which is probably one of the hardest things about thermodynamics. I recommend the text book and if you go to Rowan, definitely take Dahm.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, SI Edition review []  2019-12-27 19:5

    As far as thermo books go, this one is actually really good. The examples are unbelievable and it's simple to learn e seller packaged the book appropriately and it arrived in unbelievable condition.

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    Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, SI Edition review []  2019-12-27 19:5

    Not good scanning on the e-book makes the diagrams in the appendix unreadable, which are beautiful necessary if you ever wish to obtain your homework done.

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